Help installing router
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  1. #1

    Help installing router

    A while back someone gave me a D-Link wireless router, but it was only today I tried setting it up in preparation for multiple guests with multiple computers. I have a PC running Vista Home Premium.

    So I followed the router instructions: plug in router power cord; connect cable modem to router with network cable; connect router to my computer via 2nd network cable; restart computer.

    All the indicator lights on my router and modem were blinking as normal and as the router instructions said they should. But my computer was no longer connected to the internet. Vista's network diagnose and repair applications didn't work.

    Anywhoo, I ended up disconnecting my router. Anyone have any advice on what I should try or what settings I should be checking?
    Why is everyone who drives slower than me an idiot, and everyone who drives faster a maniac?

  2. #2
    Administrator Honored Elder jeriddian's Avatar
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    If I am not mistaken, you previously had your modem directly connefcted to your computer, and it recognized it fine. But when you put the router inbetween, that is where you ran into problems. The computer can't see the modem through the router. You may have to configure the router by getting onto its "home page", which is usually a URL number like 192.168.0.254 or something like that. Different manufacturers use different addresses. You will have to go to D-Link's web page and look up how to get to the configuration page for that router.
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  3. #3
    Registered User Regular Member Sir Sebastian's Avatar
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    Okay, I've just woken up, so my brain isn't yet workin a 100% and it's been a few years since I had a cable modem, but I'll try to offer some assistance. First, a couple questions:

    1. You said someone gave you the router. Was it new, or has it been in use?

    If it has been used, try resetting it to factory default settings. There should be a small button on the bottom or the back, something you need a tiny screwdriver or a straightened paper clip to push.

    2. Did you have to configure your ip settings manually, or are the IP and DNS addresses obtained automatically?

    If your network card has manually configured settings and the NAT function is in use on the router, your ISP is probably just refusing connection from an unknown IP. If that's the case, the settings need to be applied to the router, or turn off the router's DHCP server. I don't recommend turning off the NAT feature, it's an effective protection against intrusions.

    That's all I can come with off-hand, since the system should work the way you set it up.
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  4. #4
    Thanks for the help. I'll give it another try.

    I noticed that the router box only mentions XP as a minimum system requirement - it doesn't say it's compatible with Vista. Could that be the problem?
    Why is everyone who drives slower than me an idiot, and everyone who drives faster a maniac?

  5. #5
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuck31003 View Post
    Thanks for the help. I'll give it another try.

    I noticed that the router box only mentions XP as a minimum system requirement - it doesn't say it's compatible with Vista. Could that be the problem?
    If the router was manufactured before Vista was introduced, then I'd say yes. It probably wouldn't be able to handle the Vista software if that were the case. Does the box mention a year of manufacture, or at least a copyright date, anywhere on it?

  6. #6
    Registered User Full Member GhostWhiter's Avatar
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    I noticed that the router box only mentions XP as a minimum system requirement - it doesn't say it's compatible with Vista. Could that be the problem?
    Your router should be compatible with any networkable hardware including XP, 2000 and Linux computers and network-connected game systems (I've had each of these internet connected through my router to Comcast), so I'm thinking that is a pretty definite no. Your router box probably only mentions XP because that was the latest version of Windows out at the time and it is probably required to run the supposedly "easy set-up" software that is likely to have come with the router.

    Quote Originally Posted by canuck31003 View Post
    A while back someone gave me a D-Link wireless router, but it was only today I tried setting it up in preparation for multiple guests with multiple computers. I have a PC running Vista Home Premium.

    So I followed the router instructions: plug in router power cord; connect cable modem to router with network cable; connect router to my computer via 2nd network cable; restart computer.

    All the indicator lights on my router and modem were blinking as normal and as the router instructions said they should. But my computer was no longer connected to the internet. Vista's network diagnose and repair applications didn't work.

    Anywhoo, I ended up disconnecting my router. Anyone have any advice on what I should try or what settings I should be checking?
    First thing: look on the bottom of your router for the model number. While still connected directly to the cable modem (for Internet access) go to the D-link website and download a PDF of the full instruction manual.

    Second: make sure that the WAN port on your router is connected to the cable modem by a network wire. One of the ports should be either separate or differentiated from the rest--this is almost always the WAN port.
    Usually you can connect any of the remaining ports to your computer with another network wire.

    Third: since your router was in use before, follow Sir Sebastian's suggestion and reset your router to the factory default settings.

    If your cable Internet provider did not make you run a setup disk or load some other form of software on your computer, you might want to try to get on the Internet now--you might get lucky. If you still cannot get on the internet, the cable company's set up has probably locked their service to the MAC address of your computer's network card and you will have to complete the steps listed below

    Fourth: open a command prompt window and type "ipconfig /all" without the quotes (note the space and the direction of the slash). This works in XP, but I'm not 100% sure of Vista. Write down all of your network settings paying particular attention to the MAC address string. If this is a notebook computer you may have settings listed for two different cards. Since you are connected by a wire you want the settings for the network card that does not mention wireless in its name.

    Fifth: make sure to temporarily disable your Windows or Zone Alarm software firewall and open a browser window (IE or Firefox). Per Jerridian's suggestion, type in http://192.168.xxx.xxx with the last two sets of numbers being whatever address is listed in your manufacturer's instruction manual as the default set up page for your router (this is why you need the instructions). Enter the default username and/or password as listed in the instructions (part of why you must reset the router).

    Sixth: maneuver to a listing or a tab that says something like "Spoof MAC Address" (different manufacturers use different terms so I cannot be more specific) and enter the MAC address you wrote down in step 4. Make sure to click on any button on the page that says something like "set" or "apply" the changes you have made.

    Seventh: open a new browser window and try to surf the internet. You should be able to get on now. If things do not work, try a reboot of your computer.

    Eighth: Assuming that you can now get Internet through you router, don't forget to re-enable you software firewall. Also, open up your router settings and maneuver to a listing or a tab where you can change the username and/or password on your router and do so.

    I hope this helps.

  7. #7
    Registered User Senior Member Ran Hakubi's Avatar
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    Now, this is interesting, seeing as how I never had to install my wireless router. I just hooked it up and away I went. About the only thing I had to install was the wireless card in my moms computer.

    A couple of things I have noticed through this experiance is that it is best to not only stay brand loyal (D-Link router with D-Link wireless cards), but also, unlike clothes and rocket parts, is to buy the good stuff. Normally, the cheep stuff works well when it comes to Ethernet cards, sound cards, and stuff like that, but for some reason, the cheepy wireless things are crap.

    I've moved four times since I've gotten my wireless router, and really the only problem I've had is that the router will sometimes give up the ghost, taking out my local network an knocking both my mom and I off line. Of course, I'm fairly confident that this has more to do with the age of my equipment (Four years for both my DSL and wireless router modems), so I'm thinking that when I get the money (Hooray tax return), I can fix that little problem with a simple upgrade of equipment.

    Just a little food for thought. Seeing as how it doesn't help you with your problem, you might want to just completely ignore this post.
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  8. #8
    Registered User Full Member san's Avatar
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    there's something more to consider. it might be mentioned in the manual or not.
    i need a cross-wired (crossover and whatever those types are called too) network wire for the connecten between the WAN port of the router and the modem. maybe you need one too.

  9. #9
    Thanks for all the advice, everyone. I'm going to give it another try tonight.
    Quote Originally Posted by GhostWhiter View Post
    Fifth: make sure to temporarily disable your Windows or Zone Alarm software firewall and open a browser window (IE or Firefox). Per Jerridian's suggestion, type in http://192.168.xxx.xxx with the last two sets of numbers being whatever address is listed in your manufacturer's instruction manual as the default set up page for your router (this is why you need the instructions). Enter the default username and/or password as listed in the instructions (part of why you must reset the router).

    Sixth: maneuver to a listing or a tab that says something like "Spoof MAC Address" (different manufacturers use different terms so I cannot be more specific) and enter the MAC address you wrote down in step 4. Make sure to click on any button on the page that says something like "set" or "apply" the changes you have made.

    Seventh: open a new browser window and try to surf the internet. You should be able to get on now. If things do not work, try a reboot of your computer.
    Maybe a stupid question, but how can I access the router setup page in the browser (http://192.168.xxx.xxx) if I don't have access to the internet - is this step done with my modem connected to my computer, but not the router? Thanks.
    Why is everyone who drives slower than me an idiot, and everyone who drives faster a maniac?

  10. #10
    Super Moderator Honored Elder campy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuck31003 View Post
    Thanks for all the advice, everyone. I'm going to give it another try tonight.

    Maybe a stupid question, but how can I access the router setup page in the browser (http://192.168.xxx.xxx) if I don't have access to the internet - is this step done with my modem connected to my computer, but not the router? Thanks.
    You access the setup page with your router connected to the computer. The address may look like an internet address, but it isn't a web site, it's your router.

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