Gas Prices... They're bad enough to make you cry.
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Thread: Gas Prices... They're bad enough to make you cry.

  1. #1
    Registered User Elite Member Cloud23465's Avatar
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    Gas Prices... They're bad enough to make you cry.

    I'm Just curious to see how you guys and gals are changing your habbits to deal with the outrageous gas prices. Myself... I have a 2.0l 4 cylinder car... that gets pretty good gas milage 32-36 on the interstate. When I need things I try to go to a store that has everything I need all at once... Mostly Wal-mart or a whole sale club. I've always been pretty light footed on my gas peddle, make sure my oils changed when it needs it, Clean my air filter ( I have a K&N filter) and check my tire pressure often. I Use gasbuddy.com to find the cheapest possible price when I do need to fill up. So... what are you doing different?

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    Registered User Exalted Member Fireand'chutes77's Avatar
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    Well, in some small way, I might be adding to that rise in demand - but mostly because of a alignment of circumstances. With my dad out of commission for getting in a car because of his hip replacement, a car has opened up for me to drive, and I've been using that to take my sister and I to school and run errands. (However, that rise in demand is probably offset by the fact neither my dad or mom - who's home taking care of him - are driving much. :P)

    Usually, though, we carpool to school with a neighbor a few houses down, and I occasionally ride my bike to school.

    When reading news articles, I'm slightly outraged that only now people are "considering carpools and riding our bikes." Yeesh, you have to wait until you're getting spiked by $4-gallon gas to condescend up a carpool?

    To quote Ron from the never-before-seen lost episode of Kim Possible, "Exhausted Budget,"

    "...But Kim, these prices! They're outta control!"

    Carpe Navi: Because you never know when you'll get to go boating at government expense again.

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    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    I usually try to make all my shopping stops in one trip. When I drive home from work, I stop at any stores I need to visit on the way. Then, once I'm home, I'm done driving for the day. Same goes for shopping on weekends - one trip to cover all the bases so's not to waste gas.
    My Passat's gas tank holds just over 16 1/2 gallons of gas. That means at $4.00 a gallon, it'll cost me about $66.00 for just one fill-up!
    Good lord, that's obscene....

  4. #4
    Registered User Exalted Member Fireand'chutes77's Avatar
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    Well, just take solace in the fact that your hard-earned petrodollars are probably going to contribute to some high-end indoor ski resort in Saudi Arabia.


    Oh, wait....
    Carpe Navi: Because you never know when you'll get to go boating at government expense again.

  5. #5
    Registered User Elite Member Cloud23465's Avatar
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    I remeber I used to complain when I was first starting to drive that gas was like a Buck 50 a gallon... Now I dream of prices like that. How Ironic.

  6. #6
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloud23465 View Post
    I remember I used to complain when I was first starting to drive that gas was like a Buck 50 a gallon... Now I dream of prices like that. How Ironic.
    It's doubly ironic for me; just two years after I started driving, gasoline went over the $1.00-a-gallon mark (back in the summer of '79). And we thought that was outrageous. Now I'd gladly pay a dollar a gallon again with no complaints...

  7. #7
    Registered User Exalted Member Fireand'chutes77's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloud23465 View Post
    I remeber I used to complain when I was first starting to drive that gas was like a Buck 50 a gallon... Now I dream of prices like that. How Ironic.
    It seems odd to consider how much we're complaining when, after all, Europe has been putting up with double such prices for half-a-decade. Of course, they have highly advanced mass transit and much smaller cars, but as some people forget, their dynamics of scale are so much different than ours. The entire Continent would fit into the American Midwest. After a certain distance, rail and bus lines start to lose effectiveness - but all things considered, they're probably still more economical than a car.

    ------

    We're at war here, people. Where are our Victory Gardens, growing our own food so we don't have to import vegtables using "evil Middle East oil" or power our cars to the grocery store with the "the foul byproducts of the vicious Arabs"? (Channeling WWII propaganda here. Crude and offensive, yes, but effective at morphing public opinion - dammit, we're at war.)
    Where are government calls to "use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without"? Bond drives? Scrap-metal drives? Wartime taxes? Meatless Tuesdays? ("Processing cattle uses oil!") The subsidies for solar panels and electric cars and lowered speed limits, so we're channeling less money over to the backers of the people we're trying to fight?

    I'm reading about all this in print in a history textbook. Again and again, it stresses rationing, sacrifice, and taxes to pay for what we're doing. Does anybody these days read a history textbook before going to war?!
    Carpe Navi: Because you never know when you'll get to go boating at government expense again.

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    Administrator Honored Elder jeriddian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TransWarpDrive View Post
    I usually try to make all my shopping stops in one trip. When I drive home from work, I stop at any stores I need to visit on the way. Then, once I'm home, I'm done driving for the day. Same goes for shopping on weekends - one trip to cover all the bases so's not to waste gas.
    My Passat's gas tank holds just over 16 1/2 gallons of gas. That means at $4.00 a gallon, it'll cost me about $66.00 for just one fill-up!
    Good lord, that's obscene....
    Tell me about it...........I drive my Envoy for pretty much everything, but I still have my old 1996 GMC Suburban, you know.....the one with big V8 (not a Vortec), about 12 miles to the gallon, and a 42 gallon gas tank...........try calculating the cost of filling that one............of course I only take that out every now and then for a change of pace, maybe once or twice a month.
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  9. #9
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fireand'chutes77 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Cloud23465 View Post
    I remeber I used to complain when I was first starting to drive that gas was like a Buck 50 a gallon... Now I dream of prices like that. How Ironic.
    It seems odd to consider how much we're complaining when, after all, Europe has been putting up with double such prices for half-a-decade. Of course, they have highly advanced mass transit and much smaller cars, but as some people forget, their dynamics of scale are so much different than ours. The entire Continent would fit into the American Midwest. After a certain distance, rail and bus lines start to lose effectiveness - but all things considered, they're probably still more economical than a car.

    ------

    We're at war here, people. Where are our Victory Gardens, growing our own food so we don't have to import vegtables using "evil Middle East oil" or power our cars to the grocery store with the "the foul byproducts of the vicious Arabs"? (Channeling WWII propaganda here. Crude and offensive, yes, but effective at morphing public opinion - dammit, we're at war.)
    Where are government calls to "use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without"? Bond drives? Scrap-metal drives? Wartime taxes? Meatless Tuesdays? ("Processing cattle uses oil!") The subsidies for solar panels and electric cars and lowered speed limits, so we're channeling less money over to the backers of the people we're trying to fight?

    I'm reading about all this in print in a history textbook. Again and again, it stresses rationing, sacrifice, and taxes to pay for what we're doing. Does anybody these days read a history textbook before going to war?!
    Actually, 'chutes, some of the Arab countries producing that oil are on friendly terms with the United States. We've been allies with Saudi Arabia for decades now. In 1991, we went into Kuwait to liberate that country after Iraq invaded them and seized their oil fields. We're also allies with Jordan, Morocco, Egypt, and the Gulf sheikdoms. The prices they're charging us per barrel are not due to hostility, but economics. It's all rather complicated, and even I don't understand why OPEC (whose members also include countries from Central America) can justify their prices. It's all tied into the global economy we're a part of - there's no easy answer.
    Part of the blame also rests with the oil companies here in the U.S. Refining the gasoline used in summertime, for example, is more expensive than gas used in winter, due to additives blended in to help reduce air pollution. So naturally, they pass the cost on to the consumer in the form of higher fuel prices. Plus, I read recently that the recent spike in crude oil prices was the result of increased oil demand in countries like China and India (their economies, especially China's, have grown dramatically in the last few years). Also, OPEC's production is expected to fall by 2 million barrels a day by 2009, while non-OPEC supplies will be down 800,000 barrels a day. Commodities brokers speculating on oil futures plays a part in this too, as does the fact that the dollar is weak compared to other currencies on the world market right now.
    But you're right about one thing: We could all be doing more to reduce our dependence on, and use of, gasoline by carpooling, bicycling, taking public transit, etc. And the government could be doing more to encourage us to use alternative fuels and power sources. But Big Business is one of Uncle Sam's biggest patrons, donating millions each year to various candidates in the legislature in order to get their way and keep the profits flowing into their coffers - even if it means we common folk have to pay more at the pump.

  10. #10
    Registered User Senior Member Ran Hakubi's Avatar
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    Now, I once watched this guy on Googlevids give a speech about how there is enough oil and natural gas up in Alaska to cut our dependence on foreign down to nothing.

    Now, I'm not sure if this is true or not, but it would be worth looking into. Anything to get gas prices down at this point...
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