Sea Stories - Hornblower, Jack Aubrey, Etc. - Page 2
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Thread: Sea Stories - Hornblower, Jack Aubrey, Etc.

  1. #11
    Registered User Exalted Member lunchmeat's Avatar
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    A couple of good ones are Delilah by Marcus Goodrich and Away All Boats by Kenneth Dodson.

    The prose in Delilah is very literary (the guy who wrote it also did the screenplay for It's A Wonderful Life) and gets a little slow in spots but has some really great action sequences. Besides being a great read, it's a good way to prep for the English portions of the GRE and SAT.

    Away All Boats is about an attack transport (AKA) in the climactic invasions of the Pacific war. It's well written and gives a pretty accurate portrayal of life in the Navy's service force, as well as the idiosyncracies of the men who serve on ships.
    Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto - “You cannot invade the mainland United States. There would be a rifle behind each blade of grass.”

  2. #12
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lunchmeat View Post
    A couple of good ones are Delilah by Marcus Goodrich and Away All Boats by Kenneth Dodson.

    The prose in Delilah is very literary (the guy who wrote it also did the screenplay for It's A Wonderful Life) and gets a little slow in spots but has some really great action sequences. Besides being a great read, it's a good way to prep for the English portions of the GRE and SAT.

    Away All Boats is about an attack transport (AKA) in the climactic invasions of the Pacific war. It's well written and gives a pretty accurate portrayal of life in the Navy's service force, as well as the idiosyncracies of the men who serve on ships.
    Thanks for the referrals there, lunchmeat! I'll have to look up those books. Away All Boats sounds familiar; I thought my parents had a copy in hardcover once. I seem to remember seeing it on one of the bookshelves in the basement of our present house when I was a boy. I'm not sure if Mom still has that copy, though - I'll have to ask her.

  3. #13
    Registered User Exalted Member lunchmeat's Avatar
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    There was also a movie of Away All Boats made, I believe it was Jeff Chandler's last role. It doesn't come on very often, usually on the late, late show or one of those war movie marathons that they have on TCM around veteran centric holiays.
    Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto - “You cannot invade the mainland United States. There would be a rifle behind each blade of grass.”

  4. #14
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    My mom just bought a book as a birthday gift she's giving to my 17-year-old niece and godchild: a sea story titled "Under Enemy Colors" by S. Thomas Russell. It takes place in 1793, during the Napoleonic Wars, on board a British frigate on a mission to France. The capsule descriptions I've read sound intriguing; I may just pick up a copy for myself.
    BTW, that reminds me: I need to stop at Borders and get a gift card for my niece. Can't have her thinking her uncle/godfather's forgotten her birthday now...

  5. #15
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    I was just rereading Forester's Beat to Quarters when I noticed something: The opening salvo fired by the Lydia against the Natividad in their second battle was with the starboard battery in the novel; yet in the chart of that fight in The Hornblower Companion, it's listed as the port battery. Yet the descriptions in the novel clearly indicate it was the starboard side that opened fire. The only explanation I can find for this discrepancy is that the mapmaker drew that particular chart backward...

  6. #16
    Super Moderator Honored Elder campy's Avatar
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    Yesterday I finished reading The Baltic Gambit, the latest in Dewey Lambdin's ongoing series featuring Capt. Alan Lewrie. I really wish I'd read this one last month when I was actually in the Baltic. The climax is the Battle of Copenhagen in 1801. While Lewrie's frigate was taking fire from the Trekroner Fortress, I would have been able to go out on my balcony and see the fortress while reading about it.

  7. #17
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by campy View Post
    Yesterday I finished reading The Baltic Gambit, the latest in Dewey Lambdin's ongoing series featuring Capt. Alan Lewrie. I really wish I'd read this one last month when I was actually in the Baltic. The climax is the Battle of Copenhagen in 1801. While Lewrie's frigate was taking fire from the Trekroner Fortress, I would have been able to go out on my balcony and see the fortress while reading about it.
    Wow - that would have been something. To be in a historic location while reading what events took place there....
    Really cool!

  8. #18
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    Speaking of things nautical, I read in Blake & Lawrence's book, The Illustrated Companion to Nelson's Navy, that you can actually purchase the exact rum they served British sailors daily until 1979 (when the RN ended that tradition). It's sold as Pusser's Rum, 42% alcohol by volume; produced in Trinidad and Tobago and bottled in the British West Indies. It's distilled in the same wooden pot stills that were used to make the rum for the British Navy over two centuries ago, so it's supposed to taste exactly like it did back in Nelson's day. I bought a bottle and tried some. It's not too bad; not as good-tasting as Wild Turkey bourbon, but interesting nonetheless. Pusser's also sells a "grog mix" that one can add to the rum to make grog like the British sailors did to dilute their daily rum ration; I'm thinking of getting a bottle and trying that out. I'll let you know the results.

  9. #19
    Administrator Honored Elder jeriddian's Avatar
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    Well, it's been a year and more for this thread, but I just finished watching the 1951 film Captain Horatio Hornblower, starring Gregory Peck and Virginia Mayo, based on the original book by C. S. Forester, and interestingly, the book was adapted into the screen play for this movie by the author himself.
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  10. #20
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeriddian View Post
    Well, it's been a year and more for this thread, but I just finished watching the 1951 film Captain Horatio Hornblower, starring Gregory Peck and Virginia Mayo, based on the original book by C. S. Forester, and interestingly, the book was adapted into the screen play for this movie by the author himself.
    That film combines plot elements of three Hornblower books: Beat to Quarters, where Hornblower first meets Lady Barbara Wellesley; Ship of the Line, where Hornblower's assigned to duty in the Mediterranean harrassing the French forces in Spain; and Flying Colors, where he makes a daring escape from imprisonment in the heart of France itself. Those three books were published in an omnibus edition under the title Captain Horatio Hornblower. I found a copy in my high school library after I'd learned of Hornblower's influence on Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, so I checked it out and read it. I've been a Hornblower fan ever since.

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