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Thread: Ghost in the Shell

  1. #41
    Registered User Exalted Member lunchmeat's Avatar
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    IIRC, it's shown on Cartoon Network's Adult Swim, but at some absurd time of night - 4 AM or something.

    EDIT: Upon further examination, I don't think it's even running on Adult Swim any more. If it is, then it's not in this week's schedule.

    However, episodes can be found on iTunes and Google; they can be watched for free on Google sites, but the quality probably wouldn't be as good as iTunes. It's very important to watch some of the episodes in order, as they build off each other. The first few episodes in the first season, not so much, but IMHO, it's best to start at the beginning with the episode called "Section 9."
    Figures, while my lab is amazingly flexible, they do like me to show up and do something once in awhile. This is one of the reasons that the only time I see KP, sans video tapes and DVDs, is when there is a long holiday and I can stay up real late.

    Correct. Although I will qualify that his "son" was his adopted son, who was actually his nephew by his sister, Plinia, and was known as Pliny the Younger. Pliny the Elder himself never married or had children.
    the Italians should have sprung for a better translator on the handouts we got when I was at the two sites, then again, southern Italy is pretty casual

    Oh, not at all. My intent was to simply show that Pliny's religious beliefs, whatever they were, had no relevence to the question at hand.
    Yeah, we really don't do metaphysics, so the question doesn't really even come up.
    Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto - “You cannot invade the mainland United States. There would be a rifle behind each blade of grass.”

  2. #42
    What jeriddian said.

    To put it coarsely, science is based in part on making observations of natural events and often on taking some measure of those events, whether they be qualitative or quantitative. Religion is based on faith and spirituality. As such neither science nor religion says anything about the other.
    Why is everyone who drives slower than me an idiot, and everyone who drives faster a maniac?

  3. #43
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuck31003 View Post
    What jeriddian said.

    To put it coarsely, science is based in part on making observations of natural events and often on taking some measure of those events, whether they be qualitative or quantitative. Religion is based on faith and spirituality. As such neither science nor religion says anything about the other.
    Indeed. Religion is based on faith; whereas science is about finding the facts through empirical research. The late Carl Sagan had this to say about science in the book version of his mini-series Cosmos:
    There is no other species on Earth that does science. It is, so far, entirely a human invention, evolved by natural selection in the cerebral cortex for one simple reason: it works. It is not perfect. It can be misused. It is only a tool. But it is by far the best tool we have, self-correcting, ongoing, applicable to everything. It has two rules. First: there are no sacred truths; all assumptions must be critically examined; arguments from authority are worthless. Second: whatever is inconsistent with the facts must be discarded or revised. We must understand the Cosmos as it is and not confuse how it is with how we wish it to be. The obvious is sometimes false; the unexpected is sometimes true. Humans everywhere share the same goals when the context is large enough. And the study of the Cosmos provides the largest possible context. Present global culture is a kind of arrogant newcomer. It arrives on the planetary stage following four and a half billion years of other acts, and after looking about for a few thousand years declares itself in possession of eternal truths. But in a world that is changing as fast as ours, this is a prescription for disaster. No nation, no religion, no economic system, no body of knowledge, is likely to have all the answers for our survival. There must be many social systems that would work far better than any now in existence. In the scientific tradition, our task is to find them.
    (The words are Dr. Sagan's; the highlighting of certain sections in bold-face type is my doing, for emphasis. -TWD)

  4. #44
    Registered User Exalted Member Fireand'chutes77's Avatar
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    Weird, here's a recent real-life example of a "stand-alone complex:"

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27404513/

    ...UC Santa Cruz literature professor Mary Kay Gammel had a profound, personal lesson about political rumors last month after forwarding an e-mail she had received titled "My Vacation With John McCain" to three friends asking what they thought of it.

    The e-mail, which was not written by Gammel and which McCain's campaign said is "100 percent false," described a boorish and crass McCain on a vacation in Fiji in 2000. The e-mail was forwarded to thousands of people, and along the way the author's name was deleted and the Gammel's name was added as the author of it.

    "Then things really went wild," said Gammel, who is on sabbatical this year. Her phone rang nonstop and thousands of e-mails poured in for which she set up an automatic response explaining that she was not the author of the letter and did not know if it was true. She said she tried, herself, to track the source of the rumor hoped someone would research it to find out whether it was true.

    The email's originator has not been found.
    Carpe Navi: Because you never know when you'll get to go boating at government expense again.

  5. #45
    Registered User Exalted Member Fireand'chutes77's Avatar
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    I finally got around to seeing the original "Ghost in the Shell...."

    Kinda trippy.

    Spoilers below; ye be warned. Arrrrr.














    After reading the movie's synopsis on Wikipedia a while ago and forming my own mental picture about what happened... the reality was somewhat unexpected.

    I saw what was coming - or at least I thought I did - and both heads got blown off. I'd assumed that Motoko and the Puppetmaster had escaped to the safety of the Net and merged right before the triggers pulled... I didn't see that "reborn in another body" thing coming. I thought they would've existed as a unique Ghost on the Internet, without a body, hence the ending phrase "the Net is vast and infinite." The fact she's existing again in a physical form strips away some of the haunting-ness about the quote....

    I also hadn't expected the Puppetmaster's voice to be so deep and Michael Clarke Duncan-like. I'd expected something higher and more computerized.

    The movie seemed to meander around, not really digging too deep into any one point, and by the end I looked back on the hour and a half and bemusedly thought, "Wait... how'd we get here?" They seemed to break out into unnaturally long expositions without any lead-up... the anime was guilty of this too, but at least it wasn't as jarring.

    Good God.... that opening song.... that opening song was seriously disturbing. Waaaaayyy too high-pitched for me....

    The Major was well-done, but I prefer the anime version. Black-haired Motoko was a lot more machine-like, her voice colder, sharper, more clipped. The cybercom voices were a lot more unnerving in the movie's version.... more distorted and computerized. The lack of blinking on the part of the Major was chilling, this time in a good way. By the scuba-diving scene, it's got you seriously rattled. I found myself thinking at the screen, Blink... Blink! Blink, dammit, blink!

    It's not a problem at all with Batou's eyes; they're obviously far out of the Uncanny Valley, so your brain is comfortable with them not doing human things. The Major's eyes drop right into it, though... Despite the fact they flash in the light, they look human enough that your brain keeps wanting them to act human.... and when they don't, it's freaky. I don't think the Major's eyes blink in the anime, either, but there are fewer scenes spent staring directly at them.

    The animation was decent, but I was slightly disappointed by the heavy use of stock sound effects - namely, the twing! of ricocheting bullets and, even, the schwing! sound of a drawn blade. I suppose that had something to do with the times and technology - it was 1995, after all. Perhaps the 2008 remaster is better.

    I found the different levels of GUI technology in the movie and the anime an interesting contrast. GiTS:SAC is the technology we dream of: flawless holograms, flashy computers, the best equipment money can buy. GiTS the movie is what we're likely to get: bare-bones, low-resolution graphics in monochrome green running on old, "squeaking" computers. The computer operating spaces are cramped, dark, dingy, and littered with wires.


    I'd recommend watching the anime first, and then the movie. That way, you'll get the anime's version of the Major ingrained in your mind, and Motoko will only seem to be acting odd for 90 minutes, instead of 2 whole seasons. Also, if you watch both seasons first, you'll be able to pick up on the origins of some of the series's animation sequences a lot better - "Ah! So that's where that came from!"

    When the anime first came out, and people were watching it for the first time after seeing only the movie - while there were still no plot synopsizes to be viewed on Wikipedia - I'll bet people were freaking out about some of the anime's animation sequences, since they replicated many of the key points in the movie but went in different directions.

    BTW - was the Major in the movie and the little girl in "Barrage" voiced by the same person, Mimi Woods? The movie's voice was instantly recognizable, but I didn't quite pin it down until now.


    --------------

    On a secondary note, I was rewatching the movie's scuba diving scene and I was reminded briefly of Kim's wetsuit wardrobe exchange from "So the Drama." It's highly unlikely that the latter was inspired by the former, but I have to wonder if the KP Krew ever saw "GiTS..."

    The GiTS scene:

    http://www.mediafire.com/?mxxy1y2s02m

    (Content advisory: the clip contains one minor swear word and brief partial dorsal nudity, probably not much more than Shego's cocktail dress.)

    The KP scene:

    http://www.mediafire.com/?yzykdwjnxcm


    I assure you, this exercise was purely academic. :P

    More significant, perhaps, is Batou's mission outfit at the end of the movie: black shirt, gray pants, black gloves, blonde hair (sadly no molerat).

    Carpe Navi: Because you never know when you'll get to go boating at government expense again.

  6. #46
    Registered User Exalted Member Fireand'chutes77's Avatar
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    Update from an earlier post:

    Visible-light blocking invisibility cloak could be ready in 6 months



    Invisible suits and armaments, here we come.....

    Best of all, it'd be dirt-cheap!
    Carpe Navi: Because you never know when you'll get to go boating at government expense again.

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