What are you listening to? Track 4
Global Justice Alliance

Page 1 of 51 12311 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 501

Thread: What are you listening to? Track 4

  1. #1
    Administrator Honored Elder jeriddian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Midland, Texas
    Posts
    8,000

    What are you listening to? Track 4

    And the new thread begins with Gustav Holst'sThe Planets, as performed by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Leonard Bernstien. The first movement, Mars, is its most famous movement, and served as inspiration for some music I have been writing.

    EDIT: Corrected the Composer's name.:P
    "Say the Word"

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Honored Elder campy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Klein Innsbruck
    Posts
    7,384
    Quote Originally Posted by jeriddian View Post
    And the new thread begins with Gustav Mahler's The Planets, as performed by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Leonard Bernstien. The first movement, Mars, is its most famous movement, and served as inspiration for some music I have been writing.
    You of course mean Holst, not Mahler.

    I'm listening to the march Die Regimentskinder, op. 169 by Julius Fučik. Herbert von Karajan conducting the wind players of the Berlin Philharmonic.

  3. #3
    Administrator Honored Elder jeriddian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Midland, Texas
    Posts
    8,000
    Quote Originally Posted by campy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jeriddian View Post
    And the new thread begins with Gustav Mahler's The Planets, as performed by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Leonard Bernstien. The first movement, Mars, is its most famous movement, and served as inspiration for some music I have been writing.
    You of course mean Holst, not Mahler.

    I'm listening to the march Die Regimentskinder, op. 169 by Julius Fučik. Herbert von Karajan conducting the wind players of the Berlin Philharmonic.
    Oh, geez.......yes, I meant Holst! For some reason I was thinking of Mahler's Titan Symphony for some reason.
    "Say the Word"

  4. #4
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    The suburbs of Go City
    Posts
    10,074
    Quote Originally Posted by jeriddian View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by campy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jeriddian View Post
    And the new thread begins with Gustav Mahler's The Planets, as performed by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Leonard Bernstien. The first movement, Mars, is its most famous movement, and served as inspiration for some music I have been writing.
    You of course mean Holst, not Mahler.

    I'm listening to the march Die Regimentskinder, op. 169 by Julius Fučik. Herbert von Karajan conducting the wind players of the Berlin Philharmonic.
    Oh, geez.......yes, I meant Holst! For some reason I was thinking of Mahler's Titan Symphony for some reason.
    Not to worry, my friend. We all get confused like that at one time or another. You've got a lot on your mind right now, so don't worry about it...
    As for me, I'm listening to Four And One Moore, by the late, great Gerry Mulligan. It's off his album, The Gerry Mulligan Songbook.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Honored Elder campy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Klein Innsbruck
    Posts
    7,384
    In the iPod: Mysterious Mountain, op. 132 by Alan Hovhaness. Fritz Reiner conducts the Go City Symphony in a 1958 recording.

  6. #6
    Administrator Honored Elder jeriddian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Midland, Texas
    Posts
    8,000
    Felix Mendehlson's String Symphony No. 8, by the London Festival Orchestra, conducted by Ross Popol.

    Mendehlson was a child prodigy and wrote 13 String Symphonies in his early teens before he attempted writing full symphonies later on.
    "Say the Word"

  7. #7
    Registered User Exalted Member Fireand'chutes77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    The Old Dominion
    Posts
    2,946
    Watching Jimi Hendrix's rendition of "The Star-Spangled Banner" on YouTube after linking to it from a Washington Post article about Woodstock.

    I guess 40 years and literal non-existence at the time of the event do a lot: except for the screechy bit in the middle, Hendrix's version is awesome. It sounds like the kind of thing that'd be really cool in an action movie. I'm also amazed by the 'vocalizations' he's able to tease out of his guitar; for most of the song, it doesn't look like his fingers are even touching the strings!
    Carpe Navi: Because you never know when you'll get to go boating at government expense again.

  8. #8
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    The suburbs of Go City
    Posts
    10,074
    Currently listening to I Was A Fool (To Let You Go) by Barry Manilow; from his 1978 album, Even Now.

  9. #9
    Administrator Honored Elder jeriddian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Midland, Texas
    Posts
    8,000
    Quote Originally Posted by Fireand'chutes77 View Post
    Watching Jimi Hendrix's rendition of "The Star-Spangled Banner" on YouTube after linking to it from a Washington Post article about Woodstock.

    I guess 40 years and literal non-existence at the time of the event do a lot: except for the screechy bit in the middle, Hendrix's version is awesome. It sounds like the kind of thing that'd be really cool in an action movie. I'm also amazed by the 'vocalizations' he's able to tease out of his guitar; for most of the song, it doesn't look like his fingers are even touching the strings!
    That was the beauty of Hendrix. Of course, I did exist at the time (I was fifteen), and I was totally mesmerized by Hendrix's entire Woodstock performance. I was just starting to play guitar then, and I learned that entire Star Spangled Banner performance myself, although I could never quite get the sounds he got, but then I didn't have the souped up Fender Twin Reverb he used for it, (plus I was playing a cheap guitar, not the customized Fender strat he used). But nobody was trying evoke sound effects out of the guitar like he did. Nobody was trying to play lead riffs like he did. It was completely and excitingly new. I don't remember that song any more, but I can still play Purple Haze note for note.

    There is a story that Paul McCartney and Mick Jagger went together to see a private filming of his performance in a movie theatre in England. They both thought that their own careers in rock and roll were finished when they heard Hendrix.
    "Say the Word"

  10. #10
    Super Moderator Honored Elder campy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Klein Innsbruck
    Posts
    7,384
    On radio: San Francisco Opera's production of Giuseppe Verdi's Simon Boccanegra. Baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky sings the title role, a real-life pirate who became the first doge of Genoa in the 14th century.

Similar Threads

  1. What are you listening to? Track 5
    By jeriddian in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 118
    Last Post: 03-24-2018, 05:39 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •