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  1. #401
    Administrator Honored Elder jeriddian's Avatar
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    Speaking of classic Science Fiction, I am reading CJ Cherryh's Downbelow Station. Or I should say re-reading it. I first read it 30 years ago.
    "Say the Word"

  2. #402
    Super Moderator Honored Elder campy's Avatar
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    I'm reading Princes At War by Deborah Cadbury. It's an account of the activities of the four sons of Britain's King George V during WWII.

  3. #403
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    I'm reading William Shakespeare's Tragedy Of The Sith's Revenge by Ian Doescher. It's Revenge Of The Sith as the Bard might have written it. Pretty good, so far (I just started reading it today)...

  4. #404
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    Finished the Star Wars-Shakespeare pastiche; then I reread Solzenitzyn's One Day In The Life Of Ivan Denisovitch (in keeping with the record cold weather we're having). Now I'm reading Heinlein's Have Spacesuit Will Travel.

  5. #405
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    Finished the Heinlein book; now reading the second Star Trek book about Capt. Will Riker and his crew on the starship Titan: The Red King by Andy Mangels and Michael A. Martin. It's the second in four books (so far) about the Titan's voyages; this one involves them teaming up with Romulan Commander Donatra (who we saw in the film Star Trek: Nemesis) to close a rift in space caused by a rapidly-growing proto-universe that threatens a group of star systems, many teeming with intelligent life. A very well-written book, full of interpersonal drama as the characters work to solve the problem at hand while each deals with his or her own personal crises and demons.

  6. #406
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    As I said in the "Movies & DVDs" thread, I recently finished rereading the Terminator novelization from 1984. A nicely fleshed-out version of the script from that first film, which gives the reader some further insights into the main characters' motivations as well as bringing to life some of the supporting characters (the driver of the garbage truck at the film's beginning, for instance).
    I finished that after rereading my copy of The Stunt Man by Paul Brodeur. First published in 1970, this book was the inspiration for the 1980 film starring Peter O'Toole, Steve Railsback and Barbara Hershey and directed by Richard Rush. This was Mr. Brodeur's first novel, and it shows. There's an awful lot of dialogue in the book, mostly between the main characters as they discuss the nature of films and filmmaking. Plus, it's not very clear as to why the main character (Cameron) is fleeing from military service (in the film, he's a fugitive from the police). The film adaptation of the book gave us a much better story, IMHO. The dialogue there was uncluttered, snappy, and sounded real to me. And the film's overall plot was direct and straightforward, with none of the ambiguities of the novel.
    It's not the best book in the world, yet I'm keeping my copy. It's as much a collector's item as my DVD of the movie is, especially since the movie has become something of a cult classic over the years. (That's the same reason I'm holding onto my DVD of Gene Roddenberry's The Questor Tapes, as well as D.C. Fontana's novelization of the Questor script.)
    I'm currently rereading my copy of Jimmy Stewart: Bomber Pilot by Starr Smith. It details Mr. Stewart's time in the Army Air Corps during World War II, flying B-24 Lancaster bombers out of England on missions over occupied Europe. That's an excellent read - especially for any WWII history buffs out there.

  7. #407
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    I'm in the mood for more Honor Harrington tales, so right now I'm rereading Echoes Of Honor, having just finished In Enemy Hands last night. I think the reason I like these books so much is that the events in them parallel the events in two of C.S. Forester's Hornblower novels, Ship Of The Line and Flying Colors. I'm pretty sure David Weber was inspired by both Forester's works and the biography of Admiral Horatio Nelson when he created the Harrington series - hence the similarities between Honor and Horatio. (Although Hornblower didn't have a treecat...)

  8. #408
    Super Moderator Honored Elder campy's Avatar
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    Deep Blue, the newest Doc Ford novel from Randy Wayne White.

  9. #409
    Administrator Honored Elder jeriddian's Avatar
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    1812 by George C Daughan, a succinct though detailed description of the War of 1812 in chronological order, delving into the politics, the conflicts in Europe that influenced it heavily (i.e. the Napoleonic conflicts), the battles on land and sea, and the personages responsible who made the decisions for the events that occurred and their thinking behind it. It describes a war that is so little known, yet is the crucial event that established the US Navy permanently into American life and lore, setting it onto the road that would make this arm of the American military the preeminent naval power in human history. It also describes the actions of the only naval vessel left on active duty in the US Navy today which has actively battled and sunk an enemy warship in direct combat, the USS Constitution, her several victories at sea (with no losses), and how she got the name of "Ol' Ironsides". It can read a little dry to some people, but if you are into American military history, especially naval history, you will enjoy this book.
    "Say the Word"

  10. #410
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    Right now I'm rereading C.S. Forester's Commodore Hornblower. Hornblower takes a flotilla of ships into the Baltic to forge an alliance with the Czar of Russia in the war against Napoleon.

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