Event Horizon
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  1. #1
    Registered User Veteran Member hrodwulf123's Avatar
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    Event Horizon

    This less-known sci-fi horror from 1997 tells us a story about an starship called "Event Horizon"* which was built to test a gravity drive, and was lost soon after its maiden voyage to Proxima Centauri only to reappear seven years later in Neptune's orbit. The movie's plot implies that the ship's gravity drive did successfully open a gateway in spacetime, but it leapt outside the known universe and into another dimension, which later turned out to be the Hell itself.

    There's a scene where the rescue crew picks up the distress call from "Event Horizon" made by its captain, who says the "Liberate tutame ex inferis" a latin phrase which means "Save yourselves from Hell".

    Oh, and the soundtrack is pure awesomeness.

    * Event Horizon is a "point-of-no-return" - the point at which the gravitational pull becomes so great as to make escape impossible. The most common example of event horizon is the one of an black hole, where the gravitational pull is so strong that nothing can escape it's gravitational field, not even light.

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    Administrator Honored Elder jeriddian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrodwulf123 View Post
    This less-known sci-fi horror from 1997 tells us a story about an starship called "Event Horizon"* which was built to test a gravity drive, and was lost soon after its maiden voyage to Proxima Centauri only to reappear seven years later in Neptune's orbit. The movie's plot implies that the ship's gravity drive did successfully open a gateway in spacetime, but it leapt outside the known universe and into another dimension, which later turned out to be the Hell itself.

    There's a scene where the rescue crew picks up the distress call from "Event Horizon" made by its captain, who says the "Liberate tutame ex inferis" a latin phrase which means "Save yourselves from Hell".

    Oh, and the soundtrack is pure awesomeness.

    * Event Horizon is a "point-of-no-return" - the point at which the gravitational pull becomes so great as to make escape impossible. The most common example of event horizon is the one of an black hole, where the gravitational pull is so strong that nothing can escape it's gravitational field, not even light.
    I remember that movie. I believe it starred Sam Neill and Lawrence Fishbourne, if I'm not mistaken.
    "Say the Word"

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    Super Moderator Honored Elder campy's Avatar
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    Event Horizon doesn't sound like the most auspicious name for a starship.

    It's kind of like naming a sailing ship the Doldrums,or an Atlantic liner the Iceberg.

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    Registered User Veteran Member hrodwulf123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeriddian View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by hrodwulf123 View Post
    This less-known sci-fi horror from 1997 tells us a story about an starship called "Event Horizon"* which was built to test a gravity drive, and was lost soon after its maiden voyage to Proxima Centauri only to reappear seven years later in Neptune's orbit. The movie's plot implies that the ship's gravity drive did successfully open a gateway in spacetime, but it leapt outside the known universe and into another dimension, which later turned out to be the Hell itself.

    There's a scene where the rescue crew picks up the distress call from "Event Horizon" made by its captain, who says the "Liberate tutame ex inferis" a latin phrase which means "Save yourselves from Hell".

    Oh, and the soundtrack is pure awesomeness.

    * Event Horizon is a "point-of-no-return" - the point at which the gravitational pull becomes so great as to make escape impossible. The most common example of event horizon is the one of an black hole, where the gravitational pull is so strong that nothing can escape it's gravitational field, not even light.
    I remember that movie. I believe it starred Sam Neill and Lawrence Fishbourne, if I'm not mistaken.
    Yes, Fishburne played the captain and Neill was dr.Weir. The movie itself has some similarities with the first "Doom" game, where it's revealed that the missing Martian moon Deimos is floating above Hell itself.

  5. #5
    Administrator Honored Elder jeriddian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrodwulf123 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jeriddian View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by hrodwulf123 View Post
    This less-known sci-fi horror from 1997 tells us a story about an starship called "Event Horizon"* which was built to test a gravity drive, and was lost soon after its maiden voyage to Proxima Centauri only to reappear seven years later in Neptune's orbit. The movie's plot implies that the ship's gravity drive did successfully open a gateway in spacetime, but it leapt outside the known universe and into another dimension, which later turned out to be the Hell itself.

    There's a scene where the rescue crew picks up the distress call from "Event Horizon" made by its captain, who says the "Liberate tutame ex inferis" a latin phrase which means "Save yourselves from Hell".

    Oh, and the soundtrack is pure awesomeness.

    * Event Horizon is a "point-of-no-return" - the point at which the gravitational pull becomes so great as to make escape impossible. The most common example of event horizon is the one of an black hole, where the gravitational pull is so strong that nothing can escape it's gravitational field, not even light.
    I remember that movie. I believe it starred Sam Neill and Lawrence Fishbourne, if I'm not mistaken.
    Yes, Fishburne played the captain and Neill was dr.Weir. The movie itself has some similarities with the first "Doom" game, where it's revealed that the missing Martian moon Deimos is floating above Hell itself.
    Hmmmmm, that rather appropriate, it seems like to me. You have the two moons of Mars, the planet named after the Roman God of War, the two moons named after his two sons in Roman Mythology......
    "Say the Word"

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    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    I remember that film - it was advertised at the front of my videotape copy of Star Trek: First Contact. After a while, I ended up fast-forwarding through that (and all the other promo trailers) in order to get to the Trek movie.
    Out of curiosity, I videotaped Event Horizon once when it ran on cable but I didn't keep it. I found that film to be so gruesome and horrific that I wasn't even half-way through viewing it when I decided I'd reuse that tape, and record over the film. It reminded me of another sci-fi/horror film titled Nightflyers, starring Catherine Mary Stuart of The Last Starfighter fame. Both films contained scenes of graphic torture, and were just too creepy/spooky for me to consider watching them more than once - much less adding them to my collection.

  7. #7
    Registered User Veteran Member hrodwulf123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TransWarpDrive View Post
    I remember that film - it was advertised at the front of my videotape copy of Star Trek: First Contact. After a while, I ended up fast-forwarding through that (and all the other promo trailers) in order to get to the Trek movie.
    Out of curiosity, I videotaped Event Horizon once when it ran on cable but I didn't keep it. I found that film to be so gruesome and horrific that I wasn't even half-way through viewing it when I decided I'd reuse that tape, and record over the film. It reminded me of another sci-fi/horror film titled Nightflyers, starring Catherine Mary Stuart of The Last Starfighter fame. Both films contained scenes of graphic torture, and were just too creepy/spooky for me to consider watching them more than once - much less adding them to my collection.
    Those films are nothing compared to BBC's docu-drama "Threads" from 1984 about nuclear attack on Sheffield. This is absolutely most horrifying movie I've ever seen. No slasher flick, no gore flick, no thriller has ever left me so scared. Jesus Christ, we were so lucky that didn't happen. The movie is so brutal that it makes "The Day After" look like a light-hearted family movie...

  8. #8
    Administrator Honored Elder jeriddian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrodwulf123;41273Those films are nothing compared to BBC's docu-drama [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Threads"
    "Threads"[/URL] from 1984 about nuclear attack on Sheffield. This is absolutely most horrifying movie I've ever seen. No slasher flick, no gore flick, no thriller has ever left me so scared. Jesus Christ, we were so lucky that didn't happen. The movie is so brutal that it makes "The Day After" look like a light-hearted family movie...
    Now I know NOT to look for that film............
    "Say the Word"

  9. #9
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrodwulf123 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by TransWarpDrive View Post
    I remember that film - it was advertised at the front of my videotape copy of Star Trek: First Contact. After a while, I ended up fast-forwarding through that (and all the other promo trailers) in order to get to the Trek movie.
    Out of curiosity, I videotaped Event Horizon once when it ran on cable but I didn't keep it. I found that film to be so gruesome and horrific that I wasn't even half-way through viewing it when I decided I'd reuse that tape, and record over the film. It reminded me of another sci-fi/horror film titled Nightflyers, starring Catherine Mary Stuart of The Last Starfighter fame. Both films contained scenes of graphic torture, and were just too creepy/spooky for me to consider watching them more than once - much less adding them to my collection.
    Those films are nothing compared to BBC's docu-drama "Threads" from 1984 about nuclear attack on Sheffield. This is absolutely most horrifying movie I've ever seen. No slasher flick, no gore flick, no thriller has ever left me so scared. Jesus Christ, we were so lucky that didn't happen. The movie is so brutal that it makes "The Day After" look like a light-hearted family movie...
    Hrodwulf, I agree with you wholeheartedly. Viewing both The Day After and Threads has only solidified my opposition to the use of nuclear weapons in warfare. I remember reading one critic's review of Threads which echoes the sentiment in your last sentence almost word for word.

  10. #10
    Registered User Veteran Member hrodwulf123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TransWarpDrive View Post

    Hrodwulf, I agree with you wholeheartedly. Viewing both The Day After and Threads has only solidified my opposition to the use of nuclear weapons in warfare. I remember reading one critic's review of Threads which echoes the sentiment in your last sentence almost word for word.
    Because it's true. For example, to simulate the mushroom clouds in "The day after" they injected colored oil plumes into a tank full of water.

    And the filming crew of "Threads" got into trouble with local police department, because in order to create a mushroom cloud they detonated a large smoke bomb, and the members of the public, who were not aware that a movie was being shot, panicked and thought that a real explosion had occurred.

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