Boldly go, sir
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  1. #1
    Super Moderator Honored Elder campy's Avatar
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    Boldly go, sir

    The One True Spock, actor Leonard Nimoy, is dead at age 83.

    http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment...ek-dead-at-83/

    RIP

  2. #2
    Registered User Exalted Member kyojikasshu's Avatar
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    As a kid watching the reruns on channel 50 here in Detroit, I wanted to be like Scotty, but as i got older, I grew to identify a bit more with Spock.

    I did get to see Nimoy live with William Shatner at the Palace of Auburn Hills, as part of the "25-Year Mission" anniversary convention tour back in 1992. It was a greatly entertaining show as they went back and forth with their stories. One of my favorites was when Shatner had to return home for his dad's funeral while "Devil in the Dark" was in production, and upon his return they had to get reaction shots of Kirk to Spock's mind-meld with the Horta. As Nimoy recreated the scene, exclaiming "Pain, pain!", Shatner pointed to him and shouted, "Get that man an aspirin!" (At least, that's how I recall them telling it.) Then there was that one time where they were in a parade, and they were introduced as "William Shatner and Leonard Nimsy".

  3. #3
    Administrator Honored Elder jeriddian's Avatar
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    I can only say that perhaps the most fitting tribute that can be given to this man was uttered by his co-star in Star Trek II, the Wrath of Khan: "Of all the souls I've encountered in my travels, his was the most human."
    "Say the Word"

  4. #4
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    I met Leonard Nimoy back in early 1979, when I was a student at College of DuPage in the Chicago suburb of Glen Ellyn. He came to the school one day to talk about his one-man play, Vincent, about artist Vincent van Gogh. The play was due to run at the Paramount Arts Center in Aurora for a limited engagement back then, and Mr. Nimoy was in town to promote it. Most of his talk concerned the research he'd done about van Gogh's life, and he shared some vignettes about van Gogh with us as he spoke. He said he included a recording of Don McLean's song "Vincent" (it begins with the lyrics "Starry, starry night...") while a slide show of some of van Gogh's played on the screen at one point in the play. That impressed me so much, I found myself thinking about that song - it played in my head the rest of the time Mr. Nimoy was speaking.
    He really did his homework about van Gogh; even to the point of visiting museums that displayed art by van Gogh in whatever city he happened to be at the time. His little talk really moved me - I'd never realized how sad a life Vincent van Gogh had lived until then.
    Mr. Nimoy was kind enough to autograph a Star Trek poster magazine for me. The issue's fold-out poster was, of course, Mr. Spock. Mr. Nimoy jokingly asked, "Who's this?" as he signed it. He also autographed my copy of his first book, I Am Not Spock. When he asked me if I'd read it, I embarrassedly admitted to only having read parts of it, at which point he kidded me: "Only parts of it? If they asked you if you'd seen a painting of van Gogh's, would you say you'd only seen parts of it?" But he said this with a big grin on his face, so I knew he was just playing me.
    I have since read that whole book, as well as his later autobiography, I Am Spock. In fact, I've read the latter book numerous times now; and there have even been times when I've picked it up and reread several of my favorite chapters in it (the ones dealing with his personal appearances during the Original Series' run on television, and his adventures as a film director in the 1980's and beyond).
    I wish I could have gotten to meet him again, and gotten him to sign my copy of I Am Spock, but that's not going to happen now (*sigh*).
    At least I got to speak to him once, and let him know how much I admired him, so I'm satisfied with that much.
    Mr. Nimoy was a class act, and he will indeed be missed.

  5. #5
    There is a deep pain, in losing each of the "old guys" from Star Trek.

    Somehow, I can see that very sad scene in TNG episode, "Relics" when Mr. Scott sits in the empty bridge of the Enterprise. Everyone who once was there, is now gone.

    That's a bit specific for a non-fan. But I've been a Trekkie for over 40 years, so...
    I think Mr. Nimoy understood that deep passion that fans have for the Trek universe. Even if he never met you, there was still a unifying connection.

    Maybe I never got to meet Mr. Nimoy, but I spent a lot of time with him....with all of the Enterprise crew. Growing up I watched Trek episodes countless times, sitting on the living room floor in front of a black-and-white TV. I still have a TV tray with Mr. Spock on it.

    I have been, and ever shall be your friend.

  6. #6
    Moderator Venerated Elder TransWarpDrive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beaglebub View Post
    There is a deep pain, in losing each of the "old guys" from Star Trek.

    Somehow, I can see that very sad scene in TNG episode, "Relics" when Mr. Scott sits in the empty bridge of the Enterprise. Everyone who once was there, is now gone.

    That's a bit specific for a non-fan. But I've been a Trekkie for over 40 years, so...
    I think Mr. Nimoy understood that deep passion that fans have for the Trek universe. Even if he never met you, there was still a unifying connection.

    Maybe I never got to meet Mr. Nimoy, but I spent a lot of time with him....with all of the Enterprise crew. Growing up I watched Trek episodes countless times, sitting on the living room floor in front of a black-and-white TV. I still have a TV tray with Mr. Spock on it.

    I have been, and ever shall be your friend.
    Beaglebub, I couldn't have said it any better. You speak for all of us in commemorating Mr. Nimoy's life.
    I, too, spent many hours aboard the Enterprise - if only in my imagination - by watching the OS episodes, reading the books, or studying the Starfleet Technical Manual and Enterprise blueprints that Franz Joseph drew and published back in the mid-70's. I considered Kirk, Spock, and the rest of the crew my friends, albeit fictional ones. And to see them grow old and die like this is indeed a deep pain, like you said.
    But remember a line Dr. McCoy said at the end of The Wrath of Khan: "He isn't really dead..just as long as we remember him."
    Through the magic of film and video, Leonard Nimoy and his body of work as an actor will live on, entertaining and inspiring generations to come.

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